Saturday, May 28, 2011

Anchor Recovered Believed to be from Blackbeard's 'Queen Anne's Revenge'

Anchor recovered believed to be from Blackbeard's Queen Anne's Revenge.
An anchor from what's believed to be the wreck of the pirate Blackbeard's flagship has been raised from the ocean floor off the North Carolina coast.

Archaeologists believe the anchor recovered Friday is from the Queen Anne's Revenge, which sank in 1718. That was five months before Blackbeard was killed in a battle.

The artifact is the second-largest item at the shipwreck, outsized only by another anchor.

Researchers retrieved the anchor from the shipwreck about 20 feet under water and were bringing it to shore. The work to retrieve it began last week. The anchor is about 13 feet long and 8 feet across.

The anchor was located on top of other items that the Queen Anne's Revenge project hopes to recover from the central part of the ship. QAR project director Mark Wilde-Ramsing has said the only remaining parts of the ship -- the wooden hull structure, ribs and a plank -- are at the bottom of the pile, protected by ballast that was stored there to keep the ship upright. Six cannon and four anchors are also in the pile.

The Queen Anne's Revenge shipwreck site, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Sites, has already yielded more than 250,000 artifacts.
 The largest exhibit of artifacts from the shipwreck, which was discovered in 1996, will be shown starting June 11 at the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort. Wilde-Ramsing has said the team hopes to recover all the artifacts by the end of 2012.

In 1717, Blackbeard captured a French slave ship and renamed it Queen Anne's Revenge. Blackbeard, whose real name was widely believed to be Edward Teach or Thatch, settled in Bath and received a governor's pardon. Some experts believe he returned to piracy after growing bored with land life.

Volunteers from the Royal Navy killed him in Ocracoke Inlet in November 1718, five months after the ship thought to be Queen Anne's Revenge sank.

The Queen Anne's Revenge shipwreck site, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Sites, has already yielded more than 250,000 artifacts.

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